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Soldatova G.U., Teslavskaya O.I. (2019) Using digital technology in families with children of preschool and primary school age. National Psychological Journal, [Natsional’nyy psikhologicheskiy zhurnal], 12(4), 12–27.

Background. The ubiquity of ICTs, the decrease in the age at which digital devices began to be used, the sensitivity of the periods of preschool and primary school age, the extremely high importance of parental position regarding the use of digital devices by young children, with insufficient scientific development of this problem, necessitates obtaining and analyzing empirical data on the use of digital technologies in Russian families with preschool- and primary school- aged children.

Objective. Investigation of the ICTs usage in families with children of preschool (5-7 years old) and primary school (8-11 years old) age.

Design. The at-home study (N=100 parental-child dyads) consisted of a semi-structured interview for preschoolers and questionnaires for primary school aged children and parents of both age groups. It included questions about the level of user activity, digital initiation and culture, digital competency, parental mediation, online risks, psychological well-being and parent-child relationships .

Results. On weekdays, two-thirds (62-64%) of children aged 5–11 spend max. 1 hour on the Internet, and the rest of them spend max. 3 hours. On weekends, 48% of children of 5–11 years old spend online 1–3 hours, with 8% of preschool children and 18% of primary school children spending >3 hours. 5–7 aged children mostly use tablets, while 7–11 olders prefer smartphones. In both age groups, the leading form of digital activity is watching cartoons and videos. Children’s digital games evolve from interest in interacting with objects to preference for role-playing games. 7–1 aged kids begin to explore social networks, and use the Internet for study. 46% of 5–7 year children (46%), and 60% of 8–11 aged children have encountered online risks. Technical and content risks (pop-up banners and videos, frightening and pornographic content, viruses) prevail. 12% of primary school students encounter communication risks as well.

Most parents of preschoolers (70%) choose a strategy of being nearby their child using the Internet. In families with 8–11 aged children, adults are more tend to purposefully educate their child to use online technologies. A third of all adults surveyed admit to being insecure in the issue of online safety.

Received: 11/29/2019

Accepted: 12/12/2019

Pages: 3-11

DOI: 10.11621/npj.2019.0402

Keywords: Internet; early schoolchildren; family; parents; online activity; digital technologies; electronic devices; smartphone; tablet; tv; mediation strategies; Online risks; digital competence;

By: Soldatova, Galina U.; Teslavskaya O.I.;

Available Online: 12/31/2019

Emelin V.A. (2018) Cyberculture and network libertarianism. National Psychological Journal. 3, 03-11.

Background. Since the end of the 60s of the 20th century, the development of digital technologies has initiated the emergence of a vriety of intellectual movements that shaped the "sociocultural metasoft" of the information society, i.e. cyberculture.

The Objective of the paper is 1. to consider the phenomenon of cyberculture as a consequence of the developed digital technologies in the information society, 2. to show that cyberculture is intertwining ideologies of subcultures whose hallmark is the belief in the boundless possibilities of computer technology in terms of realizing individual freedom.

Design. The paper shows that historically the development of ideological movements of information and network technology users overlapped the postmodern worldview that has become a reflection of the social cultural and technological realities of the information society. The term "libertarianism" is suggested to characterize the ideology of the network community, whose slogan is "information wants to be free". As an illustration of the social cultural implications of digital technologies, the ideology of hackers is highlighted. The later cyberpunk movement which shaped a science fiction trend where human and technological issues are melded and brought to the fore. Cyberpunk should not be identified only with young generaion or science fiction trend, but rather should be deemed as a lifestyle in which computers, network technologies and virtual reality hold a special place.

Conclusion. It should be borne in mind that network libertarianism fueled by postmodern relativism and poststructuralist rhizomorphism turns into traps of total depreciation, becomes an obstacle to the realization of personal choice and promotes development of pathological forms of identity.

Received: 07/13/2018

Accepted: 08/12/2018

Pages: 3-11

DOI: 10.11621/npj.2018.0301

Keywords: digital technologies; cyberculture; cyberpunk; libertarianism; postmodernism; information society ;

By: ;

Available Online: 09/30/2018


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