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Soldatova G.U., Rasskazova E.I. (2017). Motivation in the structure of the digital competence of Russian adolescents. National Psychological Journal. 1, 3-14.

Abstract

In contemporary world, the digital competence of adolescents is not a separate property or capacity any longer, becoming the prerequisite and basis for many types of activities, and the Internet has become a space mediating socialization of children. Russian population study indicated that there is a «gap» in the structure of motivation to improve digital competence: although every four teenagers from five ones declare preparedness for its development, their motivation in relation to specific goals and objectives is extremely low and does not exceed 20 per cent of the maximum possible level. The paper assumes that the «gap» is caused by different contents of general and specific motivation: general motivation describes great awareness of the importance and the declared preparedness, while specific motivation refers to the setting of specific goals. Applying the Digital Competence Index (DCI) in the samples of adolescents 12-17 years old (N=1203) and of parents of adolescents of the same age (N=1208) the relationship between general and specific motivation to improve digital competences and their links to the user’s activity, confidence, emotions, self-image on the Internet and its familiarization are considered. A high level of digital competence and excessive self-confidence in the user’s skills are associated with a less general motivation. A higher level of general and specific motivation is related to the participation of teachers and parents in the development of adolescent skills in the Internet. This extremely low self-confidence and the solution of any online problems by parents are associated with passive motivation, e.g. the desire to explore the Internet spontaneously through other people. Possible methods of developing active motivation to improve digital competence and the prevention of excessive confidence in adolescents are discussed

Received: 02/10/2017
Accepted: 02/17/2017
Pages: 3-14
DOI: 10.11621/npj.2017.0101

Sections: Psychology of virtual reality;

PDF: /pdf/npj-no25-2017/npj_no25_2017_003-014.pdf

Keywords: digital competence; motivation; Russian adolescen; emotions; self-image in the Internet; Online risks;

Available Online 30.03.2017


Fig. 1. The average rate of specific motivation of improving digital competence (per cent of the maximum possible) for different types of general motivation

Table 1. Distribution of general motivation types in adolescents and their parents, and their relation to digital competence in adolescents

DC Sphere and Component

Low motivation and lack of competence

Low motivation and illusory competence

Passive Motivation

Active motivation – self-learning

Active motivation – training programs

F- Test

Statistical Effect η

Adolescents – Total

7.80%

13.60%

14.60%

21.10%

42.90%

-

-

Parents – Total

14.50%

11.10%

17.60%

17.10%

39.80%

-

-

DCI

33.8%

38.7%

30.5%

37.2%

33.0%

8.41**

0.17

Knowledge

45.1%

47.1%

37.5%

47.3%

38.6%

10.04**

0.18

Skills

36.1%

43.4%

32.2%

39.9%

33.7%

10.96**

0.19

Responsibility

35.5%

50.3%

33.6%

42.0%

37.0%

10.81**

0.19

Motivation

18.7%

14.1%

18.5%

19.5%

22.6%

8.83**

0.17

DC in Content Sphere

44.7%

50.2%

42.0%

47.3%

44.9%

5.15**

0.13

DC in Communication Sphere

34.6%

39.5%

33.5%

40.0%

33.3%

6.41**

0.15

DC in Technical Sphere

32.2%

36.8%

29.5%

36.3%

31.6%

4.61**

0.13

DC in Consumption Sphere

19.5%

24.3%

11.3%

20.6%

17.3%

12.37**

0.20

NB ** – p<0.01

Table 2. Features of adolescent online activities and experiences and type of general motivation improving DC: contingency table

Online Activities and Experiences

Groups by types of general motivation

Pearson's chi-squared test χ2

Statistical effect η

Low motivation and lack of competence

Low motivation and illusory competence

Passive Motivation

Active motivation – self-learning

Active motivation – training programs

Online Risks – Never Faced Any

27.0%

14.2%

36.5%

22.4%

20.0%

27.58**

0.16

Online Risks – Sex Image

28.1%

29.7%

29.3%

32.4%

41.4%

15.76**

0.12

Online Risks – Profile Hacking and personal data theft

28.1%

38.1%

17.4%

34.4%

26.7%

21.98**

0.14

Online Risks – Malware

29.2%

38.1%

27.5%

41.1%

40.0%

12.32*

0.10

Online Emotions – Interest

69.7%

78.1%

81.4%

84.2%

81.6%

9.93*

0.09

Online Emotions– Anger

7.9%

1.9%

3.0%

7.9%

5.1%

9.87*

0.09

Online Emotions – Excitement

14.6%

20.6%

12.6%

23.7%

21.6%

10.22*

0.10

Online Self-Image – More Aggressive

0.0%

2.6%

6.6%

2.1%

1.6%

15.71**

0.12

Online Self-Image – Unpunished

5.6%

5.2%

10.8%

5.8%

3.7%

12.14*

0.10

Online Role – Cyber Bullying

14.6%

23.2%

10.2%

8.3%

8.0%

31.52**

0.17

NB Here above there are variables to obtain differences on the significance level: * – p<0.05, ** – p<0.01

Table 3. Features of adolescent online activities and experiences and motivation to improving DC: Student’s t-test

DC Motivation in in subjects who failed to answer

DC Motivation in subjects who gave their answer

Student’s t-test

Statistical effect η

Mean Value

Standard Divergent Value

Mean Value

Standard Divergent Value

Online Risks – Never Faced Any

20.2%

16.6%

17.8%

15.8%

-2.12*

0.06

Online Risks –Information Published about me in Social Networks Was Used against me

19.4%

16.3%

23.5%

19.0%

2.00*

0.06

Online Risks –Spread of Personal Information without my Consent

19.3%

16.2%

24.6%

19.7%

2.83**

0.08

Online Risks – Malware

18.5%

16.1%

21.6%

17.0%

3.14**

0.09

Online Emotions – Happiness

18.4%

16.7%

21.0%

16.1%

2.73**

0.08

Online Emotions – Surprise

18.6%

16.4%

21.8%

16.4%

3.17**

0.09

Online Emotions – Shame

19.5%

16.4%

24.8%

16.5%

1.99*

0.06

Online Emotions – Excitement

19.1%

16.4%

21.8%

16.5%

2.29*

0.07

Online Self-Image – More Respectful

19.3%

16.2%

23.1%

18.7%

2.44*

0.07

Online Self-Image – More Successful

19.1%

16.1%

22.6%

17.9%

2.74**

0.08

Online Self-Image – More Confident

19.1%

16.2%

21.6%

17.1%

2.72*

0.07

Online Self-Image – More Communicative

18.8%

16.2%

21.4%

16.9%

2.60*

0.06

Online Self-Image – I’m Different from Others

20.3%

16.7%

17.9%

15.6%

-2.18*

0.06

Online Role – "Defender"

19.3%

16.4%

23.0%

16.5%

2.42*

0.07

Online Role – "Mediator"

19.3%

16.3%

23.6%

18.4%

2.39*

0.07

Online Role – "Actor"

19.2%

16.4%

22.9%

16.6%

2.66**

0.08

NB Here above there are variables to obtain differences on the significance level: * – p<0.05, ** – p<0.01.

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For citing this article:

Soldatova G.U., Rasskazova E.I. (2017). Motivation in the structure of the digital competence of Russian adolescents. National Psychological Journal. 1, 3-14.

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